Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique

Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique by MetalFarmer Pritham D'Souza

From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


Bottle Gourd (Lagenaria siceraria) is one of the most widely consumed vegetable crops grown in Dakshina kannada district. its also called Thure (Tulu), Bobley (Konkani) and Soorae kai (Kannada). It has several uses from preparing different kinds of sweets, hail oil (from seeds), hard shells used as floats in fishing nets and also in making some musical instruments.

The hybrid varieties can yield up to 8 to 10 tonnes per acre and is a commercially viable croo

From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


LAND PREPARATION
  • the land selected here is a hillock and pits are made at the base of the hillock as shown
  • a bucket of fresh decomposed farm yard manure is added to each pit and soil mixed well
  • stones, twigs, inert matter etc are removed
  • 3 or more seeds are then sowed in each pit
  • after germination, once the seedlings reach 4 leaf stage, thinning out is done and only 2 seedlings per pit allowed
From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


IRRIGATION AND MANURING
  • since they are grown in pits, wastage of water is prevented
  • light irrigation is a must after seeds are sowed and till transpanting
  • dried leaves act as an excellent mulch and prevent loss of water due to evaporation
  • its always recommended to give the crop nutrients in split doses.
  • on the 20th day after germination, when the growing vines begin to develop, farm yard manure, decomposed, can be added to each pit @ 5kg per pit (minimum requirement)
  • the fully grown plant requires a lot of water and so mulching is required
From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


FLOWERING AND HARVEST
  • bottle gourds are ready to harvest after 50 days from first day of sowing
  • the edible fruits are the ones whose skin color facing the sun is green
  • harvesting must be done using a knife.
From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


SOME IMPORTANT TIPS AND POINTS WHEN GROWING BOTTLE GOURDS
  • when manuring with fresh decomposed manure, care should be taken to see that the manure is added to the root zone area only and not on top of the plant as it might damage the leaves
  • weeding is very important and tall growing weeds above the growing vines should be oulled out
  • application of too much Nitrogen will result in excessive biomass and subsequently less yields
  • application of too much Nitrogen will also produce more male flowers which is not desired
  • deficiency of K (potassium) in soils reduces plant growth significantly and causes flower and fruit drop
  • soil temperature is very essential and germination of seeds wont take place if soil temp is less than 10 degrees centigrade
  • excess temperature over 40 degrees centigrade can cause scorching of leaves
Note: the pale green color on one side of the fruit is because that part did not receive sunlight and it is nothing to worry about, the taste and quality is not compromised.

From Bottle Gourd Cultivation in Pits, Summer Technique


all photos and data by Pritham 'MetalFarmer' D'Souza

14 comments:

  1. very educative and informative.. the pics too were lovely... the flowers looked very pretty, never seen the bottle gourd with it's flower still attached to the base... thank you for sharing it with us..

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  2. HEY METAL FARMER!! Dude you never cease to AMAZE me with the BEAUTY of your FARM, the intricate knowledge you have , the sheer wisdom it must take to run a place of that magnitude! The photos are gorgeous and breathtaking. I am very interested in what are the MEDICINAL qualities of your crops???

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  3. The blog is informative and prompt us to visit it.If the blog have your email address or phone number we will be delighted.We hope it will be added soon.

    ReplyDelete
  4. thanka ramesh....and Maximus.... my email id is prithamdsouza@gmail.com

    will be adding new data on medicinal and nutritional qualities of vegetable crops very soon... cheers

    ReplyDelete
  5. I really enjoyed this post. Your bottle gourds are beautiful. I haven't forgotten your invite from years a go and one day would love to visit you and perhaps play some metal. If you don't remember me I am Des from Youtube. Pumpkins, gourds and metal! I'll try to keep up with this more but I'm not often here. I spend most of my time on LiveJournal. Don't be a stranger man.

    ReplyDelete
  6. haha thanks for checking out my blog des!!!!!!!! i know u and have not forgotten u at all!!!! and my invitation still holds good!! u are welcome to come to India and stay with me for as long as u like.... hell i will even give u a temporary job here to look after the gourds!!!! cheers and keep in touch my email id is prithamdsouza@gmail.com

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  7. Hi, I'm glad you remember me. It would be nice to do that one day. Hehe, you know I'd love a job on your farm actually. That would be cool. I have a decent amount of gourds and pumpkins coming up now. Thanks for the email. I'll have to save that in my address book.

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  8. Very interesting information. However, can you clarify "too much nitrogen" or "too less potassium?" What is as suitable N:P:K ratio of fertilizer you have used? I have taken these seeds to Japan and grown them in summer last year for the first time using organic manure (guano), but would like to try out other fertilizer combinations too. Thanks.

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  9. hello Gururaj, thanks for checking my blog. i only use organic manures and when i was referring to too much Nitrogen and too less potassium i was only talking in terms of nutritional deficiencies seen in plants. many people tell me they have put plenty of fertilizers but they dont see any yield. in such cases excess nitrogen will only cause excess bio mass and delay flowering. like wise when people only use UREA as main source of fertilizers then the soils will be deficient in K and thus also affect flowering...

    generally 45:15:30 grams is the NPK requirement which is commonly used but it varies from state to state and also from practices...

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  10. Amazing blog. It's been good to see the results of your hydroponic gardening. Purely fantastic. I've been working on some rhode island hydroponics that can help. It's good for when the weather is bad outside, I can always keep my plants growing. Thanks!

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  11. These bottle gourd seems of high quality!
    Thank you for this detailed post.
    I have secured my bottle gourd with best farm fencing solution. which really helps me keep my farming assets safe.

    ReplyDelete
  12. when manuring with clean decomposed fertilizer, good care should be taken to see that the fertilizer is included to the main place area only.

    Seed Drills

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  13. Hello,

    Very Nice Blog! Can you please let me know how much bottle groud per month / per year can be grown in 1 acre of land. What is the appox amount in terms of Rs. can it generate? I have around 3 acres of land out of which I would like to use 1 acre to grow dudhi.

    Also please let me know what will approx expenses incurred to start this kind of farming.

    Regards
    Manish

    ReplyDelete